HR vs IT: who owns the employee experience? - Analytics in HR

HR vs IT: who owns the employee experience?

As with so many industries and job roles that focus their attention on managing people, human resources can be a tricky discipline to define. Its reach...

As with so many industries and job roles that focus their attention on managing people, human resources can be a tricky discipline to define. Its reach spans across everything from recruitment to internal disputes and employee satisfaction right through to finance and remuneration.

Given this wide array of specialties, it’s easy to understand why – in many organisations –HR has never quite fitted into a category of its own. Instead, a significant amount of crossover exists, with other departments fighting to claim control over what they see as their own “turf”. Nowhere is this more evident than in the increasingly complex world of employee experience.

Where once, the wellbeing of employees would have clearly fallen within the remit of HR, the departmental lines are increasingly blurred.

Now, a new wave of marketing professionals have set about redefining the role, claiming – in some cases accurately – that the way employees perceive an organisation is just as much a part of a company’s branding as the views and perceptions of end customers.

To these marketers, creating an atmosphere in which employees want to brag about their work environment and recommend their company to friends is very much a marketing stunt rather than a long-term HR initiative. In reality, both are equally true.

 

But while the HR community has been watching the marketing department, a new shift has been happening around the UK.

 

In addition to marketing, IT departments have also started to encroach upon the role of HR – specifically when it comes to managing employee experiences. According to recently released research from business communications provider Fuze, 45% of IT leaders believe that optimising the employee experience should now fall under the control of the IT department rather than HR.

To these IT professionals, employee experience is as much a technology-led issue as it is a people-led issue, with many believing that improved communication, positive collaboration and flexible work environments can only be achieved once the technology is in place to make them a feasible, effective and profitable reality.

This shift in ownership isn’t some far off vision for the IT department, but instead an increasingly clear reality.

Click here to continue reading Kris Wood’s article.


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